Exam Digest for the F Papers – Issue 2

eemeiyi —  November 11, 2016 — Leave a comment

exams-digest

F4 Corporate and Business Lawf4

 

The examination requires candidates to answer 45 multiple-choice questions in Section A, worth 1 or 2 marks each, and 5 short questions in Section B worth 6 marks each, in a total of 2 hours. All questions are compulsory.

Syllabus topics on which candidates performed well included essentials of the legal system, the law of obligations and the formation and constitution of business organisations. Syllabus topics on which candidates performed inadequately included minority protection, winding up and corporate rescue and corporate fraudulent and criminal behaviour.

Section A

Section A rewards candidates who know the rules rather than those who guess the answers. It should be pointed out that in this examination, there are several Section A questions which deal with new subject-matter introduced by the Companies (Amendment) Act 2014. Most candidates appear to be unaware of the changes brought about by the Companies (Amendment) Act.

Section B

When attempting the short questions in Section B, candidates must be aware that their answers have to be clear, unambiguous and to the point. Focus on what was asked and answer it exactly to the point. No marks were given for candidates who discussed more issues than what was required in the question.

Read the full Examiner’s report here.

More resources

F5 Performance Managementf5

Candidates preparing for the next examination of F5 are advised to work through the specimen exam, past exams and sample questions discussed here and to carefully review how each of the correct answers were derived.

Section A

Section A questions aim to provide a broad coverage of the syllabus, and future candidates should aim to revise all areas of the F5 syllabus, rather than attempting to question spot.

Section B

Section B contained 15 of the new style OT cases – with longer scenarios and 5 questions per scenario. This means that the questions are more likely to be focussed on one or two syllabus areas, again highlighting the importance of full syllabus coverage. The three main topics in Section B were risk, budgeting and target costing. Performance in the risk and target costing questions was of a high standard and showed that candidates were well prepared in these areas – both of which have featured regularly in written question in recent sittings. The budgeting questions were largely themed around flexing budgets – adjusting the original budget to actual activity level. It is an essential part of variance analysis (a key syllabus area in F5), and also demonstrates how important a knowledge of the basics of management accounting (which are covered in F2) is to passing the F5 exam.

Read the full Examiner’s report here.

More resources

F6 Taxationf6

There were two sections to the examination paper and all of the questions were compulsory. Section A consisted of 15 multiple choice questions (two marks each) which covered a broad range of syllabus topics. Section B had four questions worth 10 marks each and two longer questions worth 15 marks, each testing the candidates’ understanding and application of Singapore tax rules in more depth.

Section A

Section A questions aim to provide a broad coverage of the syllabus, and future candidates should aim to revise all areas of the F6 syllabus, rather than attempting to question spot. Further, as the questions in section A are standalone questions, the depth of the application of certain tax rules (e.g. the specific conditions that must be met for certain type of deductions to be taken) may be tested.

Section B

Candidates would need to show an understanding of the tax implications arising from a reduction of a partner’s contributed capital.

Read the full Examiner’s report here.

More resources

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